Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Bobby's guest appearance on "Cuts"

Thursday, Dec. 15 (9:30-10:00 PM, ET/PT) CUTS - When the salon must stay open for New Year's Eve, Kevin and Tiffany ditch the staff to attend a fabulous party. Meanwhile, the employees left back at the salon get a surprise when Bobby Brown (guest star as himself) stops in to get a haircut.

Network: UPN, Check your local listings

thefutoncritic.com

Sunday, November 27, 2005

Bobby will appear on VH1's Big in '05 Awards

The award show airs Dec. 4th at 8/7pm C. check your local listing for channel

VH1.com

Thursday, November 24, 2005

Happy Thanksgiving

Have a safe and blessed day...

From all of us at BBO.

Saturday, November 19, 2005

Carmine Gotti to perform "My Prerogative"

This week on VH1's But Can They Sing? and finally, will Carmine Gotti Agnello sweep the ladies off their feet with Bobby Brown's "My Prerogative?" Who will get your votes? Well, that's your prerogative!

But Can They Sing? airs on VH1 at 10P.M. ET on Sunday, November 20, 2005

realitytvmagazine.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Thank You

I had the most amazing and exciting weekend (Nov. 10-13th) while attending Bobby's concerts. Bobby and company treated me as if I was apart of the crew allowing me backstage privileges and for that I would really like to thank everyone.

Bobby- I love you so much for taking the time to acknowledge me as your #1 fan and making sure I was taken care of. The love you showed me was amazing and I will forever have your back.

Kelsey Brown- Thank you for having my back, I think I will definitely get a lot accomplished with you on my team. I am looking forward to keeping in touch with you over the years, I can't wait until your music comes out.

Landon Brown- You're so sweet, thank you for everything. I am looking forward to watching your videos too, don't hurt the ladies too bad.

LeLe Brown, Pop Brown, LaPrincia Brown and the security team- Thanks for showing me so much love this was the best weekend of my life thus far.

Being Bobby Brown is very busy

He stars in a reality TV show called "Being Bobby Brown," so it's fair to wonder: What's it really like being Bobby Brown?
"It's very busy now," he says from Sacramento, Calif., where he's rehearsing a tour that stops Sunday at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut.

That's a good thing. Brown, 36, once among the biggest names in R&B music, suffered a precipitous drop in prestige in the 1990s, when his recording career lost momentum and his legal troubles grabbed the headlines. He has been straight since the show first aired, in June, and he aims to stay that way.

"I'm trying to stay as busy as possible, you know," he says. "As you know, with the disease, it's an everyday thing. One day at a time. So I'm just trying to stay busy doing something that keeps me focused."

The disease is Brown's struggle with addiction. Devoting himself to his music and his family is the best way to stay busy, he says.
"Me being on stage and in the studio and being around my kids, that keeps me well-focused," he says.

Although Brown hasn't released a new album since 1997's "Forever," he says he has finished a new, still-untitled record; he is deciding whether to seek a label deal or release it on his own. Either way, it's a good time for him to put out an album: His TV show has raised his public profile and made him and his wife, Whitney Houston, household names again.

"A lot of people recognize me more now," Brown says. "It's not that they didn't before, but now it's more, they like the show, and they're sorry about how people treated me and my wife."

Brown's relationship with Houston has long been a subject of pop-cultural fascination, but their affection for each another is obvious on the show.

"I'm in love with my wife, and my wife's in love with me, and we're going to make this work, no matter what," Brown says. "We've been married 14 years now; we're even better now. The show for us was therapy."

In concert, Brown says, "I'm gonna give them just Bobby Brown raw and uncut. No dancers, just me and the band and the microphone, and hopefully people will enjoy the show. Well, I know they will."

"In the music industry, it's become so, how do I say it, so mechanical," he says. "It's become like a ritual for a band to have dancers; it's become a ritual for you to -- I don't ever use tracks, know what I'm saying? I like the 'liveness' of being on stage with a band and no other vocals but my own and my background singers."


newsobserver.com

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Being Bobby Brown means having showman's skills

Reality TV loves bad boys. Boston's own rascal, former r & b star Bobby Brown, aired his Bravo show "Being Bobby Brown" this summer, giving viewers a peek at the 36-year-old Roxbury native interacting with his superstar wife, Whitney Houston, and his family while trying to put his trouble-plagued life back together.

You had to smile at the bad boy's cheeky comeback performance Sunday at Foxwoods. During the soft soul of "Every Little Step," Brown bent down toward a police officer standing guard at the front of the stage and held the microphone up to the man's mouth. The cop delivered the requisite line, word perfect!

Backed by a six-piece band, Brown's slow-jam-and-funk set eventually built to a showy cover of Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" and a fun finale featuring his signature hit, "My Prerogative."

Brown did more than give the curious an up-close celebrity badass sighting. The 20-year veteran, who started out as a teen star in New Edition, can really sing when he wants to. During the slow, romantic "Rock Wit'cha," Brown momentarily stopped posturing and stood still at the mike stand. Refraining from antics, he lost himself in the song, his raspy voice swirling like a refreshing icy mist.

Wouldn't you know it, minutes later he was out on the floor, thrusting his pelvis like a mad dog in heat, the artful moment lost to Brown's infamous bad boy prerogative.


bostonherald.com

Saturday, November 12, 2005

Brown shows his better side

Bobby Brown's reputation precedes him: the boozing, the carousing, the kvetching with his wife, Whitney Houston, all captured on Bravo's reality TV show, Being Bobby Brown.

Since the king of new jack swing seems to have been making more personal appearances in courtrooms than on stages in the last decade, the announcement that he'd play the House of Blues on Thursday gave one pause.

Would Houston show?

Would Bobby's pants stay on?

Would Brown be sober?

Before answering, I must say that in Brown's rhythm-and-rhyme heyday, 1988-90, he provided some of my top live-show moments, as he was a frenetic dancer who could somersault across stages while never missing a smooth howl or a nasty rap.

And now the answers:

No Whitney.

Barely.

Can't say.

Brown dropped the mike while tearing into "Don't Be Cruel." I dropped my pen. And I wasn't drinking. Brown played it off with a quick laugh.

Resplendent in a white, pimped-out suit with a fedora pulled low over his eyes (nothing above his waist stayed on long), Brown coolly ripped into his song catalog with Drambuie smoothness. It was without the frenzy of yore, but the bark and bite were still there as he gnashed into sing-song raps, powerfully vamping the finales of "Cruel" and "My Prerogative."

"I bust my ass for you," he yelped, grabbing his rump, then bumping and grinding and grabbing his crotch through the drum thwack and silvery-stringed synthesizers of "That's the Way Love Is." Though preoccupied with lascivious tongue-wagging, Brown never missed a lick of "Love's" melody.

Giggling and promising he wouldn't re-create the backward duck-shuffle of 1989's "Every Little Step" video, Brown did just that, twirling while bringing his tough tenor to the song's screaming end.

Sloppy moments and strained notes came after a brief change into a black bowler-topped outfit. But Brown expertly spaced out the phrasings of his lover's laments, as if planning a night's seduction. Here's hoping.

philly.com

Bobby being Bobby: How reality TV helped singer get his groove back

Bobby Brown knows what people expect from him, and it's nothing good. With a rap sheet longer than his discography, Brown knows how the public perceives him.

Now the Boston-born singer turned bad boy turned reality TV star is back on the road as a solo artist. Rekindling his career with a three-city tour ending tomorrow night at Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut, Brown has a hunch why he doesn't have more gigs lined up.

"Everyone wanted to see whether I was going to show up or not, whether I was going to be Bobby," Brown said by phone from his bus yesterday. "(Thursday) night (in Atlantic City), they saw I will show up and I will be Bobby and I'll put my heart and soul into it. Hopefully, there will be more dates booked and we'll make a big tour out of this."

Brown's career has been on a downslide since his glory years when he scored nine Top 10 hits from 1988 to 1992, not coincidentally the year he married Whitney Houston. Since then, the former teenaged New Edition star has become better known for getting into trouble than getting on the charts, with arrests on charges ranging from drug possession to battery.

To the surprise of many, he bounced back this year with a hit reality TV show, Bravo's "Being Bobby Brown," which revealed him as a well-meaning, if eccentric family man with an even more eccentric wife.

He didn't do the show, he says, to put a shine on his tarnished image.

"It wasn't even that deep. It was like, 'Yo, I have child support. I need money,'" he said.

But the show turned out to be an unexpected form of therapy for Brown and his family.

"We get to look at ourselves and see what's wrong with ourselves, within ourselves," Brown said. "We're able to critique each other without an argument."

His reality TV experience, Brown says, didn't just help stabilize his family life. It encouraged him to get back into the recording studio. He already has completed an as-yet untitled album - his first since 1997. Tomorrow night's show may include previews of his material, and it will certainly include "My Prerogitive" and other hits from his solo years, along with covers of Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway songs.

After his hiatus from the musical spotlight, Brown says he's enjoying being back on stage. Each show is an accomplishment, proof that he's still capable of commanding an audience.

"I aim for the best and try to give the crowd every penny for their tickets," Brown said. "I sweat and bleed for them and that's the good part about being me. I love performing. That's my life."

Is "being Bobby Brown" easier when he's performing?

"If I could be onstage everyday," Brown said, "I'd have no need for a therapist."

BostonHearld.com

Friday, November 11, 2005

Ladies' Man Reborn: Bobby Brown Back In Shape At Atlantic City Gig

Pudge-free singer looked and sounded like his old self Thursday night.

ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey -Fifteen years ago, Bobby Brown could make 20,000 women sweat out their perms just by jumping on the stage and pretending to make love to it. This is the same man who was arrested back in the day because police deemed a concert of his too risque.

At the height of his career, B. Brown was the most magnetic performer in R&B. When Whitney calls him the "original king," she's not lying. He was bigger than Usher and R. Kelly are now, selling close to 10 million copies of his 1988 classic, Don't Be Cruel.

There were artists of Bobby's generation who could out-sing him, like Aaron Hall and Gerald LeVert, but it wasn't only his vocals that made him so great. It was the whole package: clothes, dance moves, ladies' man reputation, rebel attitude, history with New Edition and, of course, music.

For too long, though -way too long - it's looked like Bobby Brown's music career is practically over. He hasn't released an album since 1997's flop, Forever, and 95 percent of the headlines he's made in the past decade have revolved around his battles with the police.

Then poof - a few months ago he and Whitney went right back into the spotlight with the Bravo reality show "Being Bobby Brown". The show was instantly addictive, with Whitney outbursts like "Hell to the nah" and "I'm not doing this today" becoming popular catchphrases with their fans.

With Bob having everyone's attention once again, he's actually been on the road playing a handful of dates. He wound up in Atlantic City on Thursday night performing at the newest House of Blues at the Showboat casino.

Most of the fans looked to be 25 years old or better. And they remembered the times, no doubt. They remembered Bobby selling out Giants Stadium as part of the Budweiser Superfest. They remembered doing the running man in front of their TV sets when the video for his "Ghostbusters II" theme, "On Our Own," used to come on. They also remembered that on "Being Bobby Brown," Bobby had put on a lot of weight and definitely did not look like the guy girls would beg to take off his pants.

"You gotta be loud," Brown's voice boomed from backstage as the show began.

"B, B, B, B-Unit!" he continued to yell.

As Bobby came out in his all-white suit and matching hat, he really looked like the old Bobby. He was trim, clean and had a look in his eye that he was ready to reclaim the throne.

The music was familiar from the start.

As Bobby sang one of his biggest records, "Don't Be Cruel," everyone began applauding. "Girl, the only thing that matters in my life is that I'm down for you and treat you right."

His voice didn't sound too far off from what it was like in the late '80s and early '90s. "Girl, I bust my ass for you from 9 to 5," he continued in the next verse, holding his own booty for emphasis, which made the audience chuckle.

Brown segued into "Get Away" and loosened his tie. "Strip, Bobby, strip!" one young lady yelled out. He finally opened his shirt and revealed that, indeed, the suit jacket was not hiding fat. Brown is back in shape.

He rubbed his hands down his stomach and smiled to the crowd: "I ain't as fat as I was on 'Being Bobby Brown,' am I?"

During "Rock Wit'Cha," Brown took it back to '89, ad-libbing lines like "Say Bobby!/ Sometimes I just wanna touch myself." And of course, he had to dip it low, jumping on the floor and humping the ground in sync with the drummer's beats.

Brown once again played to the ladies for arguably his most beloved balled, "Roni."

"The truth about a Roni, she's always on the phone/ Talking to her homeboy, wishing they were home alone."

"You know what they gonna be, right?" he yelled to the audience - some of whom were actually slow-dancing with their dates - and then pumped his pelvis in case they were clueless.

One difference between Bobby today and Bobby yesterday is that he doesn't do the elaborate choreography anymore. He didn't even have backup dancers - just two backup singers and a band. He introduced a clique of MCs and singers called the Brown Bombers, which consisted of his oldest son and his nephews. He also let a couple of his fans come onstage and show him their moves.

"This is my house tonight," Bobby said, scolding one of the bouncers who said he could not bring anyone onstage with him. "Don't tell me I can't bring people on my stage. This is not the House of Blues tonight; this is the House of Brown."

The first girl he brought onstage - who looked to be a young teenager - came up and started doing the mono, and Bob playfully tried to follow. A woman then came up behind Bobby, jumped on the floor and grabbed his ankles. A shocked Bobby turned around, at which point the woman got up and tried to grind on him.

"You're scaring me," Bobby told her. "Really, you're scaring me. Don't have my wife come out here."

Brown's security guard then escorted the woman away.

When the stage was cleared, Bobby began "Every Little Step" but took awhile to get to the first verse because he had started signing autographs and telling fans to take pictures of him.

Then he told the crowd he only had three minutes left in the show, but followed by saying it was his prerogative if he wanted to stay a little later. This, of course, led into his most popular record, "My Prerogative," the night's closer at just about the two-hour mark.


Mtv.com

Thursday, November 10, 2005

Staying Focused: Bobby Brown at Foxwoods

He stars in a reality TV show called "Being Bobby Brown," so it's fair to wonder: What's it really like being Bobby Brown?

"It's very busy now," he says from Sacramento, where he's rehearsing a tour that stops Sunday at Foxwoods Resort Casino.

That's a good thing. Brown, 36, once among the biggest names in R&B music, suffered a precipitous drop in prestige in the `90s, when his recording career lost momentum and his legal troubles grabbed the headlines. He's been straight since the show first aired, in June, and he aims to stay that way.

"I'm trying to stay as busy as possible, you know," he says. "As you know, with the disease, it's an everyday thing. One day at a time. So I'm just trying to stay busy doing something that keeps me focused."

The disease is Brown's struggle with addiction. Devoting himself to his music and his family is the best way to stay busy, he says.

"Me being on stage and in the studio and being around my kids, that keeps me well-focused," he says.

Although Brown hasn't released a new album since 1997's "Forever," he says he has finished a new, still-untitled record; he is deciding whether to seek a label deal or release it on his own. Either way, it's a good time for him to put out an album: His TV show has raised his public profile and made him and wife Whitney Houston household names again.

"A lot of people recognize me more now," Brown says. "It's not that they didn't before, but now it's more, they like the show, and they're sorry about how people treated me and my wife."

Brown's relationship with Houston has long been a subject of pop-cultural fascination, but their affection for each another is obvious on the show.

"I'm in love with my wife, and my wife's in love with me, and we're going to make this work, no matter what," Brown says. "We've been married 14 years now; we're even better now. The show for us was therapy."

"Being Bobby Brown" isn't the only evidence of the singer's resurgence. Britney Spears last year included a cover of Brown's hit "My Prerogative" on her greatest-hits compilation last year.

"I thought the video was great," Brown says. "I liked looking at her performing my song. I mean, who wouldn't? Britney is an incredible artist in her own right. She's not Bobby Brown, but she's Britney Spears. I appreciated it. It was a nice check, also."

Spears clearly intended the song as a message to her detractors, and Brown says he can relate.

"The press was all over her about who she was dating and who she got married to. She's a grown woman, and she should be able to be herself and do whatever she wants, be a human first," he says. "To take advantage of a young lady like that - we all put ourselves in a position to be in the limelight, and we should expect all kinds of things, but she did the right song."

Unlike his admirer, though, Brown keeps it real in concert.

"I'm gonna give them just Bobby Brown raw and uncut. No dancers, just me and the band and the microphone, and hopefully people will enjoy the show. Well, I know they will," he says. "In the music industry, it's become so, how do I say it, so mechanical. It's become like a ritual for a band to have dancers; it's become a ritual for you to - I don't ever use tracks, know what I'm saying? I like the liveness of being on stage with a band and no other vocals but my own and my background singers."

Bobby Brown performs Sunday at Foxwoods Resort Casino. Tickets are $49.50 and $38.50 for the 7 p.m. show. Information: 800-200-2882.


ctnow.com

The '80s are alive

Former New Edition members host a reunion of sorts with two concerts this weekend

The eighties are alive as hip-hop power acts Bobby Brown, Johnny Gill and Bel Biv DeVoe headline concerts at Foxwoods Resort Casino this weekend.

The sold-out Gill and Bel Biv DeVoe show begins at 9 p.m. Saturday, and Brown performs at 7 p.m. Sunday.

Brown was the original lead singer of pop group New Edition that scored big in the '80s with pop hits like "Candy Girl," "Cool It Now," and "Mr. Telephone Man." The members were only in their teens when their careers hit the big time.

The group, formed by Brown, Ricky Bell and Michael Bivins, began singing together as children to earn pocket money in Boston, Mass. New Edition added two other members, Ronnie DeVoe and Ralph Tresvant, and had their first hit album, "Candy Girl" in 1983.

New Edition continued to be successful throughout the eighties and early nineties, but group members dissented into solo careers by the mid-nineties. In 1996, they released a comeback album titled "Home Again," which debuted at No. 1. The group toured briefly, but ultimately, decided to break up because of tension between members.

Though most music critics saw no chance for a reunion, the members of New Edition came together to produce "One Love" in 2004.

Brown, known for ushering in a style of music called new jack swing, had a successful solo career after leaving New Edition in 1988. Songs like "My Prerogative," "Every Little Step" and "On Our Own" took Brown to No. 1 by 1990.

By the mid-nineties, legal troubles had sidelined Brown from his music career, but not before he could marry songstress Whitney Houston in 1992.

He continues to produce albums for other artists, and has been known to record duets with up and coming artists.

Gill replaced Brown in the group, and lent his deep, soulful voice to a number of New Edition albums while still working on his solo career. Before joining New Edition in 1988, Gill had produced several solo hits of his own, including "Super Love" and "Perfect Combination."

In 1990, his self-titled album topped the R&B charts and sold a million copies. He has since released a greatest hits album, "Favorites," and a collection of his popular ballads, titled "Love Songs."

Bel Biv DeVoe formed after the release of the New Edition album "Heart Break" in 1988.

The group was rap-funk based, and produced a number of hits, including their debut album's title track, "Poison," which went to No. 3 on the charts. Hits from "Poison" also included "Do Me," and "B.B.D. (I Thought It Was Me)."

The album sold three million copies.

Tickets for the Bobby Brown show are still available through the Foxwoods.


norwichbulletin.com

Friday, November 04, 2005

Bobby's Concert Schedule...

Date: Thursday November 10
Time: 8 pm
Location: House of Blues, Atlantic City, NJ

Ticket Information: TicketMaster.com

Date: Friday, November 11
Time: 6 am - Until
Location: Atlanta, GA (Frank Ski' and Wanda Anniversary special)
Tickets can ONLY be won on the radio

Ticket Information: V-103 | 103.3

Date: Friday, November 11
Time: 7:00 PM - 3:00 AM
Location: Love the Club, Washington, D.C.

Ticket Information: Love Ticket Sales


Date: Sunday, November 13
Time: 7 pm
Location: Foxwood Resort and Casino, Mashantucket, CT

Ticket Information:The Foxwood Resort and Casino

Bobby performing in ATL and Washington D.C. on Nov 11.

at the Frank Ski and Wanda morning show anniversary celebration on Friday, Nov 11. Show starts @ 6am. Check their website for more information..

V-103 | 103.3 Thanks T. and NEFanclub

He's performing at The Love Club Doors open at 7pm and closes at 3am 21 and over.

lovetheclub.com

Tickets for The Love Club can be purchased @ groovetickets.com Thanks NEFanclub

 

                                                                        
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